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Marking in millimeters

Example 650x32A (32-590)

The first number (650) denotes the overall diameter of the tire in millimeters.
The second number (32) denotes the tire section in millimeters.
The letter A indicates that the rim is a 590 mm.

Marking in inches

Example 26*1 3/8 * 1 1/4 (32*590)

The first number (26) indicates the overall diameter of the tire in inches.
The second number (1 3/8) denotes the tire height in inches and fractions of inches.
The third number (1 1/4) gives the tire section in inches and fractions of inches.

Special case of marking in inches:

Example 28*1 5/8 * 1 1/4 * 1 1/8 or 700 C Course or 32-622

The first number (28) denotes the tire's overall diameter in inches.
The second number (1 5/8) gives the height of the tire in inches and fractions of inches.
The third number (1 1/4) indicates the tire section in inches and fractions of inches.
The fourth number (1 1/8) denotes the width of the rim which accommodates this tire in inches and fractions of inches.

ETRTO standard marking

Example 32*590 (650*32A)

The first number (32) indicates the tire section in millimeters.
The second number (590) gives the tire diameter in millimeters.

Pressure: An essential factor in risk prevention.

Did you know that tire pressure significantly influences tire performance and safety?

Under-inflated tires cause extra flexing to the casing which consequently leads to heat-build-up, an increased rolling resistance and premature wear. Under-inflated tires can lead to damage.

Over-inflated tires can also lead to a drop in mileage potential. It reduces grip and increases irregular wear.

Never set pressure to match the number listed on a tire’s sidewall because that number is the maximum safe inflation pressure for the tire and has nothing to do with the recommendation for your vehicle.

It is recommended that you check your cycle tire pressure often and especially before a long journey. Always remember to check your pressure on cold tires (not used for at least 2 hours) in order to get an accurate pressure reading.

Pressures vary according to the cyclist’s weight, but other parameters, such as the tire cross-section, bike specifications (for example front suspension or full suspension for mountain bikes) and conditions of use are also important factors in the final choice.

THE RISKS OF OVER- AND UNDER-INFLATION

 

Over-inflation reduces:

  • comfort
  • grip
  • tire lifespan

 

Under-inflation leads to:

  • Impact on vehicle handling and safety
  • An increase of rolling resistance and consequently of human energy usage

CONVERSION CHART BAR / P.S.I / KPa
 

BAR

PSI

KPA

ATM

0,5

7

50

0.49

1

15

100

0.99

1.5

22

150

1.48

2

29

200

1.97

2.5

36

250

2.47

3

44

300

2.96

3.5

51

350

3.45

4

58

400

3.95

4.5

65

450

4.44

5

73

500

4.93

5.5

80

550

5.42

6

87

600

5.92

6.5

94

650

6.41

7

102

700

6.91

7.5

109

750

7.40

8

116

800

7.90

8.5

123

850

8.38

9

131

900

8.88

9.5

138

950

9.40

10

145

1000

9.87

To prolong tire life, it is recommended to check them before each ride.

Remove all foreign objects trapped in the rubber with a small screwdriver.

Tires should be washed with water or MICHELIN approved cleaning products only as abrasive products may damage the tread or casing.

Use small rubber repair patches on the inside of the tire for any small cuts through to the ply.

Be aware that rain showers cause flint in some road surfaces to become more apparent which may damage tread, causing cuts that can perforate the casing; hence the recommendation to check your tires before each ride.

Tires should always be stored in a cool, dry, clean, indoor environment. If storage is for one month or more, eliminate the weight from the tires by raising the vehicle or by removing the tires from the vehicle. Failure to store tires in accordance with these instructions could result in damage to your tires or premature aging of the tires and sudden tire failure.

Carefully check the condition of the rim.

A rim in poor condition, i.e. broken or cracked, must be changed since it may cause leaks and place the user in danger.

Check the condition of the rim band.

A broken or cracked rim band should be changed. A rim band in poor condition is often the cause of punctures. To fit the inner tube, superimpose the valve and rim holes and keep them aligned.

Insert the 1st bead of the tire into the rim.

Inflate the inner tube slightly to make it round and insert it into the tire, starting with the valve. For latex inner tubes, remember to apply talc to facilitate positioning within the tire.

Do the same for the 2cd bead, in always starting opposite of the valve and positioning the bead correctly into the rim well. Finish fitting at the level of the valve.